20 Minutes with Kameron Hurley

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Kameron Hurely is a singular voice in the speculative fiction continuum. Not only is she the author of the Bel Dame Apocrypha (comprised of “God’s War“, “Infidel“, and “Rapture“) and the upcoming “Mirror Empire” (hitting shelves August 26), she is also a prodigious blogger, infusing the world with her startling and articulate insights. Brion and I were delighted to have this decorated veteran from the spec fic trenches take the Big Chair at the Table and we spend 20(ish) minutes discussing Wonder Woman on a kangaroo, the responsibility of writers to “own” their words, the idea of making authentic fantasy, and so much more. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, and you’ll walk away with an armload of writerly goodness (and stay tuned for the fabulousity of Kameron’s Workshop episode).

PROMO: “Broken” by Cedric Johnson and Veronica Giguere (in podcast audio or on Amazon)

Showcase Episode: 20 Minutes with Kameron Hurley

[caution: mature language – listener discretion is advised]

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Kameron Hurley brings the literary mojo…

  • Her website is a great place to take in all the awesome bloggery and access her latest doings
  • Feast on the astonishing epic saga of the Bel Dame Apocrypha: “God’s War“, “Infidel“, and “Rapture
  • Her latest literary tapestry, “Mirror Empire“, hits the shelves across the multiverse on August 26, 2014
  • Follow her on the Twitters @KameronHurley
  • Wander the halls of literary wonder with her on Goodreads

 

 

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About Author

Dave Robison has indulged in creative pursuits his entire life. His CV includes writing Curious George fan-fiction at the age of eight, improv theater at age ten, playing trumpet at age twelve, as well as a theater degree, creating magazine cover art, writing audio scripts, designing websites, creating board games, hosting mythological roundtables and generally savoring the sweet drought of expression in all its forms. His years of exploration give him a unique, informed, and eloquent perspective on the art of storytelling.

1 Comment

  1. The characters definitely suffer from passivity. Their lives happen to them and they react as best they can. They need agency. They need drive, ambition, lust, curiosity, etc.

    As is true in many stories, the villain was the most interesting character. Agravaine had the motivation of revenge for the kingdom taken from him.