20 (More) Minutes with Gail Carriger

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It has been far too long since Gail Carriger graced the RTP virtual studios with her presence and we are delighted to rectify that situation today. Author of the New York Times Best Selling “Parasol Protectorate” series and equally decorated “Finishing School” series, AND the newly launched “Custard Protocol” series, Gail brings a wealth of experience and insight into the writerly arts to the table. Of course, she’s also an archaeologist and a scientist which adds depths of scholastic rigor and research into the mix. The result is a singular and unforgettable conversation.

Joined by my sister in podcasting, Lauren “Scribe” Harris, as co-host, we engage Gail in 20(ish) minutes of writerly discourse exploring Gail’s process for developing a story idea, the influence of academic experience on the writer’s craft, the defining elements of the steampunk genre, an exciting alternative to the Hero’s Cycle narrative format, and more. There is some profoundly fabulous writerly goodness awaiting you on the other side of that “PLAY” button friends… click it! (and tune in to Gail’s equally fabulous Workshop Episode).

PROMO: The Voice of Free Planet X podcast

Showcase Episode: 20 (More) Minutes with Gail Carriger

[caution: mature language – listener discretion is advised]

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We have a FORUM! Share your comments to this (or any) episode over at the RTP Forum!

Check out this and all our episodes on iTunes and on Stitcher Radio!

Gail is a modern day British Empire (she’s civilized, she’s elegant, and she’s EVERYWHERE)…

  • One can always find her words on a host of topics… check out her place on Blogspot, her Goodreads page, and her Tumblr feed!
  • For those who prefer their words delivered to their Inbox, do consider signing up for The Monthly Chirrup, Gail’s newsletter.
  • Her Amazon Page is fairly bursting with virtual smorgasbord of literary delights.
  • Social media is her second home, so be sure to check her out or Facebook and Twitter, too!

Lauren “Scribe” Harris bring’s her A-Game to everything…

Lauren "Scribe" Harris

Lauren “Scribe” Harris


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About Author

Dave Robison has indulged in creative pursuits his entire life. His CV includes writing Curious George fan-fiction at the age of eight, improv theater at age ten, playing trumpet at age twelve, as well as a theater degree, creating magazine cover art, writing audio scripts, designing websites, creating board games, hosting mythological roundtables and generally savoring the sweet drought of expression in all its forms. His years of exploration give him a unique, informed, and eloquent perspective on the art of storytelling.

1 Comment

  1. Just caught this episode today.

    Another great discussion, as is almost always the case. I particularly appreciated the point about asking for help being its own kind of strength. I would add that from my own experience, it requires its own kind of bravery, one I often fall short of.

    I can already tell I’m probably not going to be one of Gail Carriger’s favorite writers: I’m a huge Star Wars fan, and I admit sometimes when I’m describing books I tend to talk about the concept first, then characters. Couldn’t really tell you why, because characters whom I can connect with are probably the most important element in deciding how much I’ll like a book.

    However, I’ve also been fascinated by the Heroine’s Journey ever since I attended a presentation on the subject at a Con six years ago. The woman who gave that presentation, Valerie Estelle Frankel, has since published a book on the subject, “From Girl to Goddess: The Heroine’s Journey Through Myth and Legend” (and yes, she devotes several pages to the Demeter story). It’s a great read, and I heartily recommend it.

    That said, it’s intended leadership appears to be people who like to study stories and folklore. It’s not a how-to guide for writers, and I’ve found it of only moderate utility as a resource for incorporating the Heroine’s Journey into my own fiction; we could definitely use a basic writer’s manual for writing the Heroine’s Journey.